Recent writings from the Ink Desk

  • February 23rd, 2015Treason: Now on Audibleby Michael Lichens

    Many of you may have already read StAR contributor Dena Hunt's Treason. For those who have not, it is now available as an audio book through Audible. As a subscriber, this now allows me to listen/read it a second time. You can buy the audio book at Amazon or Audible

    As well, if you prefer the paperback, it is on sale at a special price through Sophia Institute Press

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  • February 22nd, 2015A Little Lenten Storyby Dena Hunt

    It’s about excess and about privation.

    Today, some acquaintances and I went to another town to visit a priest who used to be in our parish, one we admired and loved. I’d had difficulty making petsitter arrangements and commented on that recurring problem.

    “Dogs?” scoffed an elderly lady, widowed twice. “I don’t want any dogs, no pets, no responsibilities.” Understandable. She’s blessed with family and friends who love her a great deal, but at this point, being able to go anywhere anytime at will is what’s most important to her. I’ve seen this attitude in other elderly friends. It’s especially understandable if a mate suffered a long illness before passing, but even if that’s not the case, just having raised, more or less successfully, a number of children is cause for feeling that one deserves freedom from perceived “responsibility.” They’ve had excess of a kind and are more than ready for a little privation.

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  • February 22nd, 2015How to Readby Dena Hunt

    Joseph’s post (“How to Read Great Literature,” Feb. 15) reminded me of a mini-lecture I used to deliver to students at the beginning of Intro Lit, a course that met the humanities requirement of many students who were not English or Humanities majors. How does one wade through and comprehend literary texts when one hates reading even modern fast-paced thrillers? How does one find a purpose sufficient for motivation when one’s only real purpose is to somehow get through this course with a decent grade? Most of them were science/technology or business majors. I summarized Donald Hall’s classic “Four Ways to Read,” adding a twist by linking it to intellectual development.

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  • March 2nd, 2010Hot Off the Pressby Joseph Pearce

    Long awaited sequel examines Shakespeare's plays in light of his Catholic faith
    2/24/2010 - 12:59 PM PST

    SAN FRANCISCO, CA (February 24, 2010) - A new book just released from Ignatius Press, "Through Shakespeare's Eyes: Seeing the Catholic Presence in the Plays", gives further evidence of what many people have long suspected: that the famous William Shakespeare was indeed a Catholic. Fulfilling the promise he made in his previous book, "The Quest for Shakespeare", bestselling literary writer Joseph Pearce analyzes in this volume three of Shakespeare's immortal plays - "The Merchant of Venice", "Hamlet" and "King Lear" - in order to uncover the Bard's Catholic beliefs.

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Current Issue of StAR

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March/April 2015Storm Troopers of Secularism: Lessons for Today from the Nazi Past

Sample Articles from Issue

March/April Table of Contents

The German Tragedy Revisited