Recent writings from the Ink Desk

  • October 20th, 2014Tolkien on Lewis’s Christianityby Joseph Pearce

    I write from Nashville, where I’m currently teaching my class on “Modern Christian Writers”. Today we were tackling Chesterton’s Man Who was Thursday. Returning to my office from the classroom, I came across an e-mail in my in-box enquiring about Tolkien’s attitude to Lewis’s conversion to Anglicanism. The exact wording of the e-mail is given below. My brief response follows.

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  • October 18th, 2014On St. Luke’s Feastby Dena Hunt

    I’ve heard that St. Luke’s Gospel is the favorite of women. I don’t know if that’s true, but it’s my favorite and I’m a woman. Men prefer St. John’s, so I’ve been told, which might be a little surprising, since St. John’s is called the “poetic” Gospel.

    I never knew why I liked St. Luke’s best, but one minor bit of obscure history may help a little to explain it. The testimony of women is notably absent in the New Testament. That’s because the women’s testimony was never permitted – never deemed credible – in the Jewish society of Jesus’ time. It may be noted that Mary Magdalen’s testimony that Jesus was risen, that she had seen him and spoken with him, was disbelieved by the apostles, still in hiding, on that Easter morning.

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  • October 18th, 2014Approaching what is Real: Don Quixote, God, and the Rest of Usby Kevin O'Brien

    For they had bartered the reality of God for what is unreal, and had offered divine honors and religious service to created things, rather than to the Creator--He who is for ever blessed. Amen. (Rom. 1:25)


    As we drive around the country performing murder mystery dinner theater shows, my actress Maria Romine and I listen to audio books.  We've lately been listening to Don Quixote, the unabridged version, read very well by George Guidall.

    It's a 40 hour long production, and we're only about five hours into it.  But we're listening to parts that I've never read (my printed version is abridged). 

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  • March 2nd, 2010Hot Off the Pressby Joseph Pearce

    Long awaited sequel examines Shakespeare's plays in light of his Catholic faith
    2/24/2010 - 12:59 PM PST

    SAN FRANCISCO, CA (February 24, 2010) - A new book just released from Ignatius Press, "Through Shakespeare's Eyes: Seeing the Catholic Presence in the Plays", gives further evidence of what many people have long suspected: that the famous William Shakespeare was indeed a Catholic. Fulfilling the promise he made in his previous book, "The Quest for Shakespeare", bestselling literary writer Joseph Pearce analyzes in this volume three of Shakespeare's immortal plays - "The Merchant of Venice", "Hamlet" and "King Lear" - in order to uncover the Bard's Catholic beliefs.

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Current Issue of StAR

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Recusants and Martyrs: English Resistance to the Tudor Terror

Sample Articles from Issue

September/October 2014 Table of Contents

Tudor Church Music and Revisionist History