Recent writings from the Ink Desk

  • April 15th, 2015Perils of Ironyby Daniel J. Heisey

    “What a miserable little snob Henry James is,” wrote Theodore Roosevelt to a friend in June of 1894. Roosevelt had just read James’ short story “The Death of the Lion” in the April issue of a new periodical called The Yellow Book. “His polished, pointless, uninteresting stories,” Roosevelt continued, “about the upper social classes of England make one blush to think that he was once an American.” As an antidote, Roosevelt read something by an Englishman then living in Vermont: “I turned to a story of [Rudyard] Kipling’s with the feeling of getting into fresh, healthy, out-of-doors life.”

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  • April 15th, 2015Perils of Ironyby Daniel J. Heisey

    “What a miserable little snob Henry James is,” wrote Theodore Roosevelt to a friend in June of 1894. Roosevelt had just read James’ short story “The Death of the Lion” in the April issue of a new periodical called The Yellow Book. “His polished, pointless, uninteresting stories,” Roosevelt continued, “about the upper social classes of England make one blush to think that he was once an American.” As an antidote, Roosevelt read something by an Englishman then living in Vermont: “I turned to a story of [Rudyard] Kipling’s with the feeling of getting into fresh, healthy, out-of-doors life.”

    » Continue Reading
  • April 15th, 2015How Close was C. S. Lewis to “Crossing the Tiber”?by Joseph Pearce

    I’ve received a letter from a Catholic seminarian, requesting my opinion of an article by Eric Seddon in Mythlore which included a somewhat shrill attack on a position that I had allegedly taken in my book, C. S. Lewis and the Catholic Church. Here’s my response:

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  • March 2nd, 2010Hot Off the Pressby Joseph Pearce

    Long awaited sequel examines Shakespeare's plays in light of his Catholic faith
    2/24/2010 - 12:59 PM PST

    SAN FRANCISCO, CA (February 24, 2010) - A new book just released from Ignatius Press, "Through Shakespeare's Eyes: Seeing the Catholic Presence in the Plays", gives further evidence of what many people have long suspected: that the famous William Shakespeare was indeed a Catholic. Fulfilling the promise he made in his previous book, "The Quest for Shakespeare", bestselling literary writer Joseph Pearce analyzes in this volume three of Shakespeare's immortal plays - "The Merchant of Venice", "Hamlet" and "King Lear" - in order to uncover the Bard's Catholic beliefs.

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Current Issue of StAR

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March/April 2015Storm Troopers of Secularism: Lessons for Today from the Nazi Past

Sample Articles from Issue

March/April Table of Contents

The German Tragedy Revisited