• January 22nd, 2015C. S. Lewis & the Catholic Churchby Joseph Pearce

    A week or so ago I gave an interview to a Spanish magazine on C. S. Lewis and the Catholic Church. I'm delighted to see that this has been picked up by the Catholic News Agency, thereby ensuring that the interview has an English-speaking readership also. Here's the link:

    http://www.catholicnewsagency.com/column.php?n=3085

  • January 22nd, 2015C. S. Lewis & the Catholic Churchby Joseph Pearce

    A week or so ago I gave an interview to a Spanish magazine on C. S. Lewis and the Catholic Church. I'm delighted to see that this has been picked up by the Catholic News Agency, thereby ensuring that the interview has an English-speaking readership also. Here's the link:

    http://www.catholicnewsagency.com/column.php?n=3085

  • January 22nd, 2015Why Should I Learn This?by Joseph Pearce

    The Kindle and ePub versions of Why Should I Learn This?, published by Homeschool Connections, to which I contributed a chapter on Shakespeare, are now available. They are uploaded to the Homeschool Connections website and ready for download:  http://homeschoolconnectionsonline.com/free-ebook.

  • January 22nd, 2015Tolkien on Mortality, Myth and Moreby Kevin O'Brien



    Here are some clips of an excellent special recently aired by EWTN, in which I portray J. R. R. Tolkien, and in which author Joseph Pearce describes the Catholic elements of The Lord of the Rings.  Everything I say as Tolkien are word-for-word quotations from his writings.  The special also features artwork by Jef Murray.  As you can see, this was a very well produced program, and is well worth the $10 EWTN is selling the DVDs for.

    In the first clip, Tolkien explains the relation between Myth and Truth.



    In the second clip, Tolkien explains how he himself is a hobbit.



    In the third clip, Joseph explains how Tolkien  understood The Lord of the Rings to be, primarily, about "death and immortality".



    These clips are all copyright EWTN 2014.  The entire show is an hour long and is available from the EWTN Religious Catalogue.



  • January 20th, 2015Solzhenitsyn: Triumph of the Christian Willby Joseph Pearce

    I'm honoured to have been quoted today in an excellent article about Solzhenitsyn on the Investor's Business Daily's website:

    http://news.investors.com/management-leaders-in-success/012015-735309-alexander-solzhenitsyns-exposed-ussrs-prison-camps.htm?p=full

  • January 19th, 2015Catholic Daughters on Catholic Giantsby Joseph Pearce

    I was pleased to see a review of my book Catholic Literary Giants in Share, the magazine of the Catholic Daughters of the Americas:

    http://www.nxtbook.com/mercury/mercury/CDA_Share_Winter_2014-15/#/38

  • January 19th, 2015Eucatastrophe and The Hobbitby Joseph Pearce

    Having recently discovered a wonderful and wonder-filled new website, eucastrophe.com, I was especially gratified to discover that one of my own videos promoting the Catholic Course on The Hobbit has been uploaded to the site:

    http://www.eucatastrophe.com/?p=1133

  • January 19th, 2015The Best of Ratzingerby Joseph Pearce

    Continuing my custom of sharing correspondence with my current and former students with visitors to the Ink Desk, here's the reply to a student asking for advice on which three books by Ratzinger (prior to his election as pope) I would recommend for special focus:

    In my own studies of Ratzinger, I have found the following to be the most helpful and brilliant:

    Milestones: Memoirs 1927-1977, 1998

    “In the Beginning …”: A Catholic Understanding of the Story of Creation and the Fall, 1990

    The Ratzinger Report, 1985

    The Spirit of the Liturgy, 2000

    I would especially recommend The Spirit of the Liturgy for its importance in the restoration of tradition to the Church's worship.

    I would also recommend "In the Beginning" as a brilliant exposition of the Book of Genesis and its importance to our understanding of who we are as human beings.

    Milestones is Ratzinger's own memoir, containing many profound theological insights, and The Ratzinger Report illustrates Ratzinger's brilliant understanding of the problems besetting the Church at the end of the twentieth century. 

  • January 19th, 2015Is Beauty Sacramental?by Joseph Pearce

    A former student of mine is currently embarked on a research project on the topic of "sacramental beauty". She sent me some questions related to her topic which are published below, together with my response:  

     

    How would you personally define sacramental beauty?

    Beauty, as one of the three transcendentals, is a manifestation of the presence of the Trinitarian Godhead. Goodness (virtue) manifests the Trinity; truth (reason) manifests the Trinity; and beauty manifests the trinity. As such, and properly perceived, beauty is always a sign of God's presence that is meant to lift us in prayer and praise. 

     

    Do you think a vibrant and colorful sunset, or even just the warm glow of sunset, falls under the category of sacramental beauty? 

    Yes. Absolutely. If we fail to see the sign of God's presence in the beauty of any sunset, it is we and not the sunset that is at fault. Humility opens our eyes to beauty; pride blinds us to it.

     

    And, lastly, do you think one's ability to notice sacramental beauty is linked with the imagination?

    I think our ability to express and communicate the beauty to ourselves and others is connected to the imaginative faculty but the ability to see beauty is much more primal and is connected to virtue (humility) or its absence. The humble soul will always be edified by the presence of beauty, even if he lacks the imaginative gifts to articulate his experience of it; the proud soul will be blind to beauty, regardless of any imaginative gifts that he has been given (and for which he lacks gratitude!).

     

    Finally, you might find helpful an article that I wrote recently for the Imaginative Conservative: http://www.theimaginativeconservative.org/2015/01/gutter-man-grandeur-god.html

  • January 19th, 2015Chesterton and the Power of Paradoxby Joseph Pearce

    Why does Christ say that we must be child-like and St. Paul say that we have to cease being childish? Why are Bilbo and Frodo childlike? Why is Dorian Gray childish? And what did Chesterton have to say about the difference between the childlike and the childish? These questions are asked and hopefully answered in my latest article for the Imaginative Conservative:

    http://www.theimaginativeconservative.org/2015/01/chesterton-power-paradox.html

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What are your thoughts on the subject?